ALL SCI-FI Forum Index ALL SCI-FI
Nothin' but pure science fiction!
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Beyond the Time Barrier (1960)
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ALL SCI-FI Forum Index -> Sci-Fi Movies and Serials from 1950 to 1969
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Bud Brewster
Galactic Fleet Admiral (site admin)


Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 11590
Location: North Carolina

PostPosted: Wed Jan 01, 2020 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

________________________________

Great, Eadie! Very Happy

The print for Beyond the Time Barrier is better than any of the DVDs I've bought over the years. It was a 4:3 print, and TCM did NOT zoom in to make it "widescreen" (cutting off parts the top and bottom) the way they did when they've aired The Thing from Another World the last few times.

Forbidden Planet and World Without End looked wonderful, too.

_________________
____________
Is there no man on Earth who has the wisdom and innocence of a child?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bud Brewster
Galactic Fleet Admiral (site admin)


Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 11590
Location: North Carolina

PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2020 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

________________________________

Today I found out that the recently broadcast movies on TCM like Beyond the Time Barrier, Forbidden Planet, World Without End, and The Time Machine are available to me (free of charge) on DISH. Very Happy

I was glad to learn this, because I'd deleted all my recently DVRed recordings from last Wednesday's TCM sci-fi marathon. I figured that since I had DVD's of all those movies, I didn't need to keep the ones I'd recorded.

However, Eadie's comment concerning the aspect ratio of the TCM airing caused me to wish I still had my DVR. So . . . I was glad to find a way to recover them!

I must admit, folks, that 21st Century technology has a few advantages . . .

_________________
____________
Is there no man on Earth who has the wisdom and innocence of a child?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bud Brewster
Galactic Fleet Admiral (site admin)


Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 11590
Location: North Carolina

PostPosted: Fri Jan 10, 2020 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

________________________________

I was so impressed by the picture quality of the features shown on TCM's New Year's Day Sci-Fi Marathon that I decided to update of my discs of Beyond the Time Barrier, World Without End, and The Time Machine.

I've ordered the same DVD of Beyond the Time Barrier which the TCM Shop offers, since that should be the one they showed on January 1st. It's the latest of several DVDs released, and it should be much better than that crappy 4-Feature cheapo I now have.



_______________


I also ordered the newest Blu-ray of World Without End to replace the double-feature DVD I've had for about 15 years which includes Satellite in the Sky (a great movie, too.)


_______________


I figured I was on a roll, so I did the obvious thing by finally upgrading my old DVD of The Time Machine (in a crappy cardboard box) with the highly-rated Blu-ray shown below.


_______________


They'll all be arriving this weekend, and I'd love to watch them in All Sci-Fi's Chatzy room anytime you guys want to! Very Happy

By the way, if anyone would like to have DVDs I've replaced, just send me a PM with your mailing address and I'll pack them off in a few days — along with a stack of other DVDs with features I've replaced and tossed into a box, hoping to find somebody who'd want them.

I used to send the DVDs I'd replaced to the late Bulldogtrekker . . . until he passed away last year. Sad

As for "live movie chats", I realize I'm probably the only nerd on the planet who's arranged his living room to make both his web surfing and his TV watching so convenient —






— but I keep hoping some of you guys can manage something similar so that we can bring back All Sci-Fi's Friday Live Chat!.
_________________
____________
Is there no man on Earth who has the wisdom and innocence of a child?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bud Brewster
Galactic Fleet Admiral (site admin)


Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 11590
Location: North Carolina

PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2020 11:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

________________________________

I'm extremely impressed with the write-up in the Wikipedia article for Beyond the Time Barrier. The author did a fine job of research, and the article in the "production" section is well written.
_____________________________

Production

Producer Robert Clarke was exhausted from directing and acting in his production, The Hideous Sun Demon, and sought a director for this film. He had previously worked with Edgar G. Ulmer on The Man from Planet X and respected him.






Clarke's funds originated in Texas, and the backers stipulated that the film be shot there, where motion picture unions had no influence. Clarke filmed in the Texas Centennial Exhibition Fair Park buildings. He secured cooperation from the US Air Force and Texas Air National Guard allowing him to film at Fort Worth's Carswell Air Force Base and the abandoned Marine Corps Air Station Eagle Mountain Lake.

He obtained and used film footage of an F-102 Delta Dagger standing in for the test plane.






The film's action sequences used Air Force weapons, M1 carbines and M1911A1 pistols, with the actors taking care not to fire the weapons directly at one another.





The film's working title was The Last Barrier.

Production designer Ernst Fegté employed a triangular motif for the futuristic sets that were filmed in the vacant showground buildings. Surplus parachutes were hung in the background to muffle echoes.

Clarke chose Darlene Tompkins over several contenders for the mute and psychic Trirene, including Yvette Mimieux (who appeared in The Time Machine) and Leslie Parrish.






Ulmer selected his daughter Arianne for the role of Captain Alicia Markova, whose name came from the ballerina of the same name. Ulmer choreographed the daughter's movements similar to a ballet dance as she loosened her flight suit.

When giving her speech inciting the mutants to revolt in a Soviet uprising, Arianne deliberately used voice inflections similar to Laurence Olivier reciting the St. Crispin's Day Speech from Henry V. American International Pictures (AIP) added footage to the mutant uprising sequence from their film Journey to the Lost City. One mutant was played by the screenwriter Arthur C. Pierce. Pierce was involved in the production and worked as an assistant editor.

Tompkins recalled that the actors portraying the mutants, whose makeup was created by Jack Pierce, taught her how to play cribbage on the set while in costume. Tompkins was asked to do a nude swimming scene for overseas release. She refused and swimming scenes were done by a body double.

When filming her swimming in a flesh colored bathing suit, the crew used the motel swimming pool where they were staying; their night filming was disrupted by a fire that broke out at the motel.

Former football player Boyd Morgan performed stunts and played the Captain of the Guard. Darrell Calker, the music chief of Walter Lantz's cartoons, composed an effective film score.

AIP's James H. Nicholson was keen on releasing the film based on his teenage daughters' recommendation after screening the film. AIP partner Samuel Z. Arkoff, asked Clarke what he wanted to do with the film. Clarke said he wanted to produce several films for AIP, but Arkoff said AIP didn't use contract producers.

Clarke found a similar, but newer and inexperienced film company called Pacific International Pictures (PIP) or Miller-Consolidated Pictures who were keen on working with Clarke and releasing his films. However, PIP went bankrupt and AIP was able to purchase two of Clarke's films held by PIP for no more than the laboratory costs. The films were released under the AIP banner.

AIP exploited MGM's publicity for The Time Machine by releasing their film a month before MGMs. Clarke was paid only his acting salary.

American International Pictures (AIP) released the film in September, 1960 on a double bill with The Angry Red Planet It was theatrically released in some areas on a double bill with The Amazing Transparent Man, another Ulmer-directed film.


__
_________________
____________
Is there no man on Earth who has the wisdom and innocence of a child?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bud Brewster
Galactic Fleet Admiral (site admin)


Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 11590
Location: North Carolina

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2020 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

________________________________

I had a long phone conversation recently with a good friend I've known since the 5th grade, a gentleman named Chuck who've I've mentioned in other posts, such as the ones for The Time Machine and Mysterious Island.

Chuck joined All Sci-Fi today, and I'm eager to hear what he thinks about this post, based on our boyhood experiences. Very Happy

When were were kids, Chuck and I shared many afternoons at a small local theater in the little town of East Point, GA, which was located so close to our home town of College Park that the northern city limits of our town was the southern city limits of East Point! Very Happy

The theater in East Point was called (appropriately enough) the East Point Theater. Sadly, it was demolished in 1972, and the only photo I've ever found of it is this pitiful thing, which was taken well after it closed.



________________


Ah, but you guys know how much I like to fiddle with jpegs using Paint.net — so I went to work on this picture, widening it by duplicating the outer portions of the building and pasting them onto the sides.

Here's what that produced.



________


Then I performed a "virtual pressure wash" on those dirty bricks to clean them up a bit, and I removed that distracting telephone wire. The bone white sky isn't very appealing, so I pasted in a new one with fluffy clouds. Very Happy

Next I added one-sheet posters to the display cases which flanked the ticket booth, and also a big poster in the display area directly behind the booth. All three posters are for Beyond the Time Barrier.

Finally, I added the title of the movie to the marquee.

TA-DAAA! The East Point Theater lives again! Cool



________


During my recent conversation with Chuck, he astounded me with his detailed memories of the many times he and I (along our close friend Jimmy) spent long afternoons at the East Point Theater. Here's what Chuck told me.

He said he would ask his parents for just one dollar to spend with his friends. One measly buck was all he needed. Shocked

And once he had this tidy fortune in the pocket of his jeans, he and I (and our pal Jimmy) would make the 25 minute walk from our subdivision to College Park — complete with a vintage train station —






— and a wild night life . . . as you can see from this photo taken on a typical Saturday night. Rolling Eyes





My friends and I would wait patiently at the bus stop (located on a side street next to a feed store) until the bus arrived and the driver took his scheduled rest room break. When he returned, he let us board the bus after we'd forked over the exorbitant fare of . . . 10¢. Shocked

Remember, guys, we left the house with one precious dollar each to finance our day-long adventure. And now we were down to 90¢.

Our trusty driver would then steer the bus back out onto main street and head for Atlanta, with stops along the way at locations between College Park, East Point, and other small towns along the way, until it reached our famous state capitol — which was about ten miles away.

Chuck reminded me that we sometimes took the bus all the way into Atlanta to see movies at the Fox Theater, the Lowe's Grand, and the Rialto.






However, East Point was just down the road, and the bus delivered us so close to the movie theater that we could actually see it before the bus even stopped.

A short walk from main street and over the railroad tracks brought us to the ticket both — where 25¢ from our meager funds got us into the theater.

And what did we get for this exorbitant sum? Confused

We were all royally entertained by the previews of coming attractions — as well as the hilarious cartoons.


__________________ Coyote And Road Runner


__________


But our day was far from over after our cinematic experience. Right next to the theater was a bowling alley called Duckpin Bowling, which used undersized pins and small wooden balls.





There was no fancy machinery which came down to reset the pins. All that was done by teenagers in the area behind the alleys. They would hustle back and forth behind the lanes to clear away the fallen pins and get each alley ready for the next ball thrown by the bowlers.

The price charged for this enjoyably activity was a fraction of the original dollar my friends and I left home with, and after enjoying ourselves for an hour or so, we'd leave and walk back towards main street East Point to have lunch.

Just a block south of the bus stop, which was across the tracks from the theater and the Duckpin Bowling Alley, was a Kryslal Restaurant, which served ridiculously cheap hamburgers that were small enough to be eaten in four bites.





A Krystal hamburger was just one thin dime in those days, so my friends and I could buy a hardy lunch and stuff our mouths full while discussing the science fiction movie we'd just enjoyed. But we were careful to save enough money to afford our ride back home on the bus.

And so, we boarded the southbound bus and gave the driver the last of the money we'd left home with — 10¢. Very Happy

We returned home in the late summer afternoon flat broke — but with a wealth of priceless memories. Three friends who were bonded together by the same passion — our love for science fiction . . . not to mention Duckpins Bowling and Krystal hamburgers. Very Happy

_________________
____________
Is there no man on Earth who has the wisdom and innocence of a child?


Last edited by Bud Brewster on Thu Mar 26, 2020 12:12 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Maurice
Quantum Engineer


Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 311
Location: 3rd Rock

PostPosted: Thu Mar 26, 2020 12:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bud Brewster wrote:
He obtained and used film footage of an F-102 Delta Dagger standing in for the test plane.


Except in those space shots, where they got a model kit and made those swing down stabilizers. Smile
_________________
* * *
"The absence of limitations is the enemy of art."
― Orson Welles
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ralfy
Astral Engineer


Joined: 23 Sep 2014
Posts: 291

PostPosted: Thu Mar 26, 2020 7:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

1080p version here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_qtVrBHX9s
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ALL SCI-FI Forum Index -> Sci-Fi Movies and Serials from 1950 to 1969 All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3
Page 3 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group