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Family - TNG season 4 episode 4

 
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Pow
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2020 9:29 pm    Post subject: Family - TNG season 4 episode 4 Reply with quote

"Family" was the fourth episode of the fourth season and aired on October 1, 1990.

Written by Ronald D.Moore and directed by Les Landau.

While the Enterprise-D is in dry dock; Captain Picard returns to his home on Earth at the French vineyards where he grew up.

"Family" is considered one of the most heart stirring episodes produced by ST:TNG and is a fan favorite.

And Gene Roddenberry absolutely loathed it.

GR felt that the plot for this episode had no place in his vision for the 24th century.

He felt that by the 24th century hostile relationships between siblings as seen with Picard and his brother, Robert, would be non-existant.

In fact, the federation was a utopia with no interpersonal conflicts whatsoever.

Such an edict by GR made writing for the series a huge challenge.

GR was also not pleased about the negative implication regarding how Picard's parents raised Jean-Luc & Robert.

Script writer Ronald D.Moore felt that after the events that occurred in "The Best of Both Worlds" parts one & two that Picard would have been negatively & profoundly affected by his assimilation by the Borg.

He would be suffering from PTSD and would not simply & easily pickup where he left off prior to his capture.

Picard resuming command of the Enterprise-D as if nothing happened was both unrealistic and insulting to dedicated fans of the show.

RDM wanted to explore the impact upon Picard as well as his estrangement with his brother.

Producers Michael Piller & Rick Berman asked RDM to meet them in GR's office to discuss RDM's script for "Family."

GR harshly criticized the script, which left RDM feeling crushed.

All these years later, RDM still recalls the pain from that day.

Producers Rick Berman & Michael Piller liked RDM's script and supported him and got the episode made in spite of GR's dislike of the script.

Trivia; This episode would be unique in several other ways.

It has no scenes taking place on the bridge.

It has no science "B" subplot story.

Data doesn't appear.

Two subplots were considered and then dropped. One was about a child stowaway on board the Enterprise.

The other was about a paranoid's nightmare about disappearing crew members. This plot line would be used later in the episode "Remember Me" with Dr. Crusher being the one who experiences crew vanishing.

The location for the Picard estate in Labarre, France was actually shot at a private dryland operation near Lancaster, CA. SW of Edwards Air Force Base.

The heat during filming was extreme at the time.
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Bud Brewster
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2020 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

________________________________

Mike, on behalf of all our members I'd like to thank for your amazing post! Very Happy

The info you shared is an amazing glimpse into the mind of Gene Roddenberry. His vision of mankind's future was both bold and noble — but we've all suspected that it was totally unrealistic.

Your post proves that. Shocked

I know we all desperately hope that mankind will someday evolve into angelic beings who have more in common with the Krell than with creatures who have the deeply flawed natures we now possess.

But that just doesn't seem likely to happen in the near future . . . and in fact, I don't think it will ever happen! Rolling Eyes

TNG's Family presents Jean-Luc Picard as a courageous and complex human being who experienced a terrible ordeal — and yet fought to recover is stolen humanity! The fact that he succeeds proves that he is much more noble that some "highly evolved" version of mankind who no longer has do deal with the pain and anguish which (for examples) every soldier experiences during the horrors of war! Shocked

I admire Gene Roddenberry's high hopes for mankind — but I'm appalled by his unrealistic belief that mankind will improve because we simply create "a utopia with no interpersonal conflicts whatsoever."

That sounds more like the Vulcan society than mankind! And I've always assumed that Star Trek's primary message about the difference between Vulcans and humans was that we DID successfully deal with interpersonal conflicts . . . while Vulcans did not! Confused

Mike, your post is a real eye-opener. It clarifies troubling things about Roddenberry's nature which I have always suspected.

Thanks! Very Happy

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Pow
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2020 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're welcome Bruce, I am always pleased that you and fellow members get a kick out of anything I post.

And I always greatly enjoy having this fantastic forum where I can post & read the post from you and other members.

Gives me food for thought.

Yeah, Gene was a visionary but at the same time his desire to depict humanity individually---and the Federation of Planets as a whole--- as totally perfect was simply unrealistic.

We all carry both angels & devils within us and that's the truth.

I can imagine just how onerous the task had to be for the writers for ST:TOS & ST:TNG was when they had to write ''perfect people."

Drama = conflict. Perfect people don't offer conflict and are a fantasy to boot.

I recall reading Babylon 5 creator J.Michael Stracynski saying in an interview when he was about to produce B5, that he figures that all the problems, quirks, flaws, weaknesses that humanity has will follow them right out into the stars.

I find it intriguing that ST:TOS & Mission:Impossible---which are considered "sister shows" because they both were produced by Desilu; both debuted on TV in the fall of 1966; and both were unlike any TV series before them---also have another thing in common.

Gene wanted perfect people as we've noted with ST:TOS.

M:I creator Bruce Geller wanted his Impossible Missions Force team to be ciphers. Little to nothing of their personalities was to be in evidence while on an assignment.

Almost nothing of the mission team members personal backgrounds or private lives is ever revealed over the course of the show's seven seasons.

Geller insisted upon this with his writers. You could create the villains and anyone not on the team with any characterizations you wanted to...but never the IMF team.

The audience knew that the IMF team were the good guys and not anything else.

Peter Graves joined the show as a regular cast member & IMF team leader Jim Phelps on the second season of the series and would remain with the show until its cancellation in its seventh season.

He told about an early episode he did where at the finale when the villains had been stopped how he turned to the camera and smiled.

Graves was letting the audience know that Phelps was pleased that they got the bastards.

Geller edited the scene so the smile was gone.

He informed Graves that the IMF team do not convey any such opinions regarding a mission.

They get in & get it done, exit.

No one associated with Geller really understood why he wanted his IMF agents to remain devoid of any signs of their true natures or character.

Anyways, I always found it interesting that two different & very talented creators had a somewhat similar approach for their regular cast members.

Roddenberry wanted perfect people; Geller wanted blank slates.
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Krel
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 2020 12:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't remember the question he was asked, and this is most probably not an exact quote. But Rod Serling once said, that no matter how far in the future, or how far mankind travels, people will always be people.

David.
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johnnybear
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 10, 2020 8:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unless they're apes?
JB
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Krel
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 10, 2020 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Then that would be apekind not mankind. Laughing

David.
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