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The Day After Tomorrow (1976 British) aka Into Infinity
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Pow
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 02, 2022 10:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From author Chris Bentley. NBC executive George Heinemann, who wanted to develop a series of seven self-contained one-hour educational specials, each of which would focus on a particular topic.

He commissioned Gerry Anderson who had just completed the first season of Space: 1999 to produce program which would explain the premises and effects of Albert Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity in the format of an action-adventure show that would appeal to younger viewers.

As it was by no means certain at this time that ITC would commission a second season of Space: 1999, this special was designed with the potential for an ongoing series if the initial episode, titled "Into Infinity," were to prove successful.

Sidebar: I would have loved to see this TV-movie become a weekly show over the return of Space: 1999.

Gerry & Sylvia Anderson could have saved somewhat on the budget by recycling sets, props, costumes, spaceships that had been used on Space: 1999 and employ them on Into Infinity.

The critical issue would have been to hire superior writers for Into Infinity and not continue to use the same ones who had scripted Space: 1999. Otherwise, Into Infinity would have simply suffered the same fate as Space: 1999 by having inferior writing for its episodes.

The answer would have been to search out and hire top notch science fiction writers to not only script Into Infinity, but to come on board as story editors.

Writers that had written for The Twilight Zone, The Outer Limits, and Star Trek: TOS would have the talent to recruit.
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johnnybear
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2022 9:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If they had gone into producing a series of Into Infinity and the BBC were very interested in helping with production costs, it would have been more like Lost in Space than Space 1999 was to Star Trek! Trouble is it wouldn't have been a hit in the US because none of the cast were American and the stories although probably would have been more realistic than other Anderson shows like 1999 or even Star Trek itself but those kind of tales would not guarantee an lasting audience!!! And let's face it, it would now get much criticism just like a lot of people seem to give 1999!
JB
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Bud Brewster
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2022 10:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pow wrote:
He commissioned Gerry Anderson who had just completed the first season of Space: 1999 to produce program which would explain the premises and effects of Albert Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity in the format of an action-adventure show that would appeal to younger viewers.

What an amazing idea!

A show about Einstein's theories . . . for younger viewers. Hmmm. Clearly the younger viewers in Britain are much smarter than the kids her in the U.S. And the adults too, for that matter!
Sad
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Pow
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 19, 2022 11:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From Starlog Magazine.

"They know it is impossible for them to return to their own space and time. They must now come to terms with their existence on the other side of a black hole. One thing is for sure, this is not the final word. Not the end, but the beginning . . . . a new universe . . . . ? A new hope . . . .? Only time will tell." Narration by Ed Bishop (UFO) at the conclusion of the movie.

Producer Gerry Anderson. "I would have made some changes to the movie. I would have liked to have made the people aboard the Altares less perfect."

"Space journeys will have carefully selected crews. They will be well-balanced, well-adjusted, calm human beings. Such an ideal crew for a new and untested space vehicle doesn't make for interesting characters to put on screen for an audience."

"Scruffier, and a little less perfect, more reluctant, would make for a more interesting crew to watch."

Problem: How to introduce Einstein's Theory of Relativity to a young viewing audience --- a theory so complex that many adults cannot comprehend it, let along younger people.

Solution: Make the presentation so exciting that kids want to learn.

Result: Gerry Anderson's television production of The Day After Tomorrow.

Professor John Taylor of the London University served as the scientific advisor for the movie.

"It really was an extremely difficult script to produce because it was easy enough to put together a space journey, extremely difficult to get over in a few words of dialogue problems of time changes that affect long distance space travel. You also have to do it in a language young people comprehend."
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Pow
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2022 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

More from Starlog Magazine.

A nine-to-ten year round-trip flight to Alpha Centuri, the nearest star system to us, would seem like a few weeks away for the crew aboard a spacecraft.

Adult astronauts would return to find their children as old, if not older, than themselves. Therefore, Gerry Anderson and script writer Johnny Byrne, assumed it would be logical to send out complete family groups as crew on such journeys.

This would also solve a problem since the movie was intended for kids by having a young girl and boy as part of the cast.

Johnny Byrne, "I didn't want Jane and David to come across like kids do on Saturday morning programs. They act out kids adult fantasies like being superheroes, or secret agents. Jane and David were part of a real world we were developing, so they had to be just like real children."

In order for spacecraft to travel near the speed of light (186,000 m.p.s.), the craft is propelled by a photon drive system. Chemical rockets are used for traveling to near-by planetary bodies.

It was also envisioned that spacecraft in the future would be launched from orbiting space stations as Delta.

As the Antares approaches Pluto when it begins it travel, the planet changes from a deep blue color to bright red as it passes the planet. This illustrates the effects of the Doppler Shift. The Antares begins to glow bright red when it approaches light speed because light waves are being squashed into one end of the spectrum as a result of the Antare's great speed.
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Pow
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2022 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Starlog Magazine.

Brian Johnson & Nick Allder spent six weeks creating the special effects.
Martin Bower constructed two versions of the Altares spaceship. A six foot one for close-ups, and a three foot one for long-shots.

The model was equipped with rocket nozzles loaded with freon gas for showing a jet stream, and a high-intensity light for indicating the photon motor.
The cost for the TV-movie was $225,000.

Gerry Anderson had hopes that NBC executives would pick up The Day After Tomorrow as a prime-time television series.

Sidebar:
I wish they had done so too Mr. Anderson.
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