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Best editions of Jules Verne

 
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Steve Joyce
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Joined: 14 Dec 2013
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 2013 8:08 pm    Post subject: Best editions of Jules Verne Reply with quote

Verne suffers greatly at times in translation (and editing).

Here's a website that partially sorts things out:
http://najvs.org/works/index.shtml

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Bud Brewster
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 19, 2013 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a very interesting website, Steve. Thanks.

I remember enjoying 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea at an early age and then later finding out that Mr. Verne's novels were translated from French. Whoever did the translation for the version I read did a terrific job.

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Last edited by Bud Brewster on Thu Feb 01, 2024 1:09 pm; edited 2 times in total
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scotpens
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2014 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In my high school years, I read the works of Jules Verne in a series of excellent English translations which, if memory serves correctly, were published by Penguin Books in the 1960s. Some of the earlier translations are rather stilted and difficult to slog through.

That reminds me of the oft-repeated factoid about Jules Verne's use of the name "Nemo" -- that it's "omen" spelled backwards. Pure coincidence, of course, since Verne wrote all his novels in FRENCH!

("Nemo" is actually Latin for "no man" or "nobody." But we all knew that, right?)
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Bud Brewster
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2024 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Didn't take me long to find a picture of the paperback edition I read long ago. I wasn't sure I remembered it correctly, but as soon as I saw this picture, I knew this was it. It's a Bantam publication from 1964, with a translation by Anthony Bonner.

By gum, I think I still have it in a box of paperbacks!



A little further down on the Google page that had the picture above was this stunning painting by Gregory Manchess (oil on canvas).

Wow . . .



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Is there no man on Earth who has the wisdom and innocence of a child?
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mach7
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just finished reading this book.

It held my interest but lacked something.
Probably due to the translation.

I wish Vern had been able to keep the Polish/Russian conflict storyline. It would have explained a lot about Capt Nemo's motives.
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Bud Brewster
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2024 11:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mach7 wrote:
I wish Vern had been able to keep the Polish/Russian conflict storyline. It would have explained a lot about Capt Nemo's motives.

I must my confess my ignorance on that point. What was the "Polish/Russian conflict storyline", and why was not used?

Illuminate me, Monsieur!
Very Happy
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mach7
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2024 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What I understand is that the original version of the book had
Nemo being a Polish nobleman whose family was killed by the Russian army during the 1864 January uprising.

Nemo swore off mankind, used his fortune to build the Nautilus, and brutally killed any Russians he found at sea.

At the time France was allied with Russia, so his publisher made him remove all references to Russia.

At least that was what was written in the forward to the book
I read.
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Bud Brewster
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2024 1:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

______________________________________________

Wow! Thanks for that important background for this classic novel. Very Happy

Nemo's background is described this way in Wikipedia.
______________________________________________

Nemo is a mysterious figure. Though originally of unknown nationality, he is later described as the son of an Indian raja. A scientific visionary, he roams the depths of the seas in his submarine, the Nautilus, which was assembled from parts manufactured in several different countries, then shipped to a cover address.
______________________________________________

I assume this was the revision Verne made to satisfy his publisher.

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mach7
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2024 2:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Having just read the book, the only indication of Nemo's origin was vaguely European. Nothing in the book that I remember indicated an Indian heritage.

Maybe my opinion of Nemo's heritage was formed from the book's forward.
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Bud Brewster
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2024 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

______________________________________________

Ah-ha, you mean a forward that was written for the particular edition you have. If so, I'd be interested in what you might learn if you reviewed. Very Happy

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mach7
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just reviewed the introduction, the only indication of Nemos origin is Poland.
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