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The Incredible Hulk (1977~1982)

 
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Pow
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2024 12:10 am    Post subject: The Incredible Hulk (1977~1982) Reply with quote



The Incredible Hulk was based upon the Marvel comic book by legendary writer Stan Lee & legendary artist Jack Kirby, which debuted in May of 1962.

The CBS television show premiered on November 4, 1977 and ended on May 12, 1982. It comprised 80 episodes, and 5 TV-movies. It was developed for television by Kenneth Johnson.

Opening narration by Ted Cassidy: Dr. David Banner ---- physician, scientist ---- searching for a way to tap into the hidden strengths that all humans have. Then an accidental overdose of gamma radiation alters his body chemistry.

And now, when David Banner grows angry or outraged, a startling metamorphosis occurs. The creature is driven by rage and pursued by an investigative reporter.

"Mr. McGee, don't make me angry. You wouldn't like me when I'm angry." Dr. David Banner.

The creature is wanted for a murder he didn't commit. David Banner is believed to be dead. And he must let the world think he is dead until he can find a way to contain the raging spirit that dwells within him.

Note from me: And thus began one of the finer science-fiction superhero television series ever produced. The Hulk, as created by Lee & Kirby, was a morphing of the Frankenstein monster & Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde. Just like the compelling The Fugitive TV series, Dr. David Banner is unjustly accused of the murder of a someone. It was Dr. Richard Kimble's wife that he was falsely accused of murdering; for Dr. David Banner, it's a colleague of his. Whereas Dr. Kimble is relentlessly pursued by the law (Inspector Gerrard); Banner is hotly sought after by dogged investigative Jack McGee.

Dr. Banner is wonderfully played by Bill Bixby. The incredible Hulk by the impressive Lou Ferrigno.
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Bud Brewster
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2024 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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I regret to say that in view of the wonderful movies which have featured the Hulk in recent years . . . this TV series looks seriously dated. Sad

The fault lies in the fact that the original concept presented in the comic books simply can't be portrayed by painting a body-builder green and then filming his scenes in slow motion. Rolling Eyes

Even the first few Hulk movies which employed CGI didn't quite get it right. It took Marvel Studios a while to perfect their efforts to present Bruce Banner as the Hulk in a manner that impressed aging fans like me.

But the trailer below certainly shows us just how hard the TV network endeavored to impress us. To be fair, I applaud their efforts.


_ The Incredible Hulk (1977 - 1982) Modern Trailer


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Last edited by Bud Brewster on Mon Feb 12, 2024 4:14 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2024 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only option they obviously had back then is to paint a professional weightlifter green. CGI either didn't exist at all or was in its infancy. So in that regard, you can say the series is dated from what they could do visually with the Hulk.

However, the scripting remains pretty darn good in that the series stories usually dealt with topical issues such as child abuse, alcoholism, the mentally challenged, drug addiction, and so forth. It was a series that had something important to say from time to time. There were also episodes about good versus evil. The underlaying issue was David Banner's struggle with quelling that his rage could morph him into the superhuman powerful Hulk. So like Dr. Richard Kimble on The Fugitive, we saw David journeying from place in order to find the answer to his dilemma. And just like Kimble, Banner would encounter people who were in bad situations who could use his help.

The series really did have something to say with many of its stories. So to liken this to Irwin Allen's productions is really not accurate at all. I'm not proposing that the Hulk is a perfect show, or would have been nominated for any Hugo Awards. Although Mariette Hartly did receive an Emmy Award for her role as a guest star. But to dismiss the series entirely as dross is wrong.
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Bud Brewster
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2024 6:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Mike, I guess this is just a difference in our opinions concerning the way the Hulk can be effectively presented in movies or TV series.

Here's what you stated.


Pow wrote:
The only option they obviously had back then is to paint a professional weightlifter green. CGI either didn't exist at all or was in its infancy. So in that regard, you can say the series is dated from what they could do visually with the Hulk.

I realize they couldn't have done it any better than they did.

What I'm stating it that . . . it just wasn't good enough. Sad

Mike, I admire the defense you've made in the past when I criticized a movie or series for not living up to my adult standards. But sometimes I just can't accept "they couldn't have done it any better" when the results just didn't impress me . . . even when I was a kid and didn't have the high standards I do today.

I read the Marvel comics like the Hulk when was a teenager, so I had very specific ideas about how the character would look on the screen.

And as you stated, the show just wasn't able to present the Hulk with the kind of dynamic appearance he had in the comic!






So, maybe the producers should have just waited until the series could give us a Hulk that didn't look quite so much like a large green Leprechaun with a bad attitude! Shocked

But of course, that's just one man's opinion.
Mr. Green
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2024 8:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As a lifelong comic book fan, I eagerly awaited the day when films & television would be able to produce live action superheroes. I knew that in order to do the superpowered heroes and villains that the visual effects technology had to be able to successfully support such movies and shows.

When The Incredible Hulk first premiered back in 1978, clearly the then current special effects technology was was not up to the task of presenting a Hulk that would be as sensational looking as the Stan Lee-Jack Kirby comic. Plus, TV budgets and their grinding shooting schedules worked against such an endeavor.

What I'm trying to convey, Bruce, is that while it wasn't the time to created a Hulk TV series due to those factors I've mentioned, I believe that producer/writer Kenneth Johnson made the right calls with how the Hulk was done on TV within those limitations. Johnson knew that he could not give the audience a big science fiction show. He could not afford, or visually present a series that would be able to mimic the Marvel comics. So no outer space aliens, killer robots, or even any Marvel villains for the Hulk. Johnson had to work with what the tools that he had on hand in the medium he was in. David Banner became a new day version of Dr. Richard Kimble's classis Fugitive series. The lone and lonely man on the run attempting to seek the answer to his problem. Both were relentlessly pursued; and both would meet up with individuals and help them with their challenges, while still being unable to solve their own. At the end of that week's episode both would be forced back on the road.

Should such an ambitious character have been attempted in 1978? No, I would agree with you on that particular item. However, what Johnson did come up with was the best way to do the production under the circumstances. I would also say that many of the existing stories were entertaining, if not award winning ones. You seem to want to throw the baby out with the bathwater, Bruce. I'm looking at the diamonds in the rough (maybe diamonds is to extravagant a term) that were contained in some of the scripting, directing, and acting. To each their own.
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Bud Brewster
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2024 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

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Mike, you've convinced me that I was wrong to say the series should not have been made until the special effects could create a more convincing hulk. Clearly the series excelled in other ways, and I've short-changed the production with my dismissal of it. Sad

I'll confess that I was not a fan of the series, so I didn't give it a chance to show me just why it was well-worth watching. Part of the reason for my negative feelings are my lack of enthusiasm for the series was the use of slow-motion during dramatic scenes to supposedly enhance the action.

The Six Million Dollar Man, which aired a few years earlier, annoyed me with their use of slow motion scenes and electronic sound effects every time Lee Majors was supposed to run fast.

Oh brother . . . Rolling Eyes

Anyway, thanks for being patient with your pig-headed friend while he criticized a good TV show for all the wrong reasons.
Mr. Green
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