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Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961)
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Bud Brewster
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 12:26 pm    Post subject: Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961) Reply with quote

______


Walter Pigeon ("Forbidden Planet") plays Admiral Nelson, designer and commander of the submarine called Seaview, the "Cadillac" of atomic subs, complete with big fins and gloriously oversized view ports.

In terms of science fiction, this film is only moderately successful. The story's basic concept is centered on the mistaken idea that the Van Allen radiation belt could catch fire and envelope the world in a flaming ring which raises the temperature and melts the polar ice caps.

But "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea" is enjoyable as pure adventure -- with submarine-versus-submarine battles, a sneaky saboteur on board, an attack by both a giant octopus and a giant squid, and an encounter with a flurry of submerged mines whose anchor wires snag on the Seaview's hull.

The visual imagery provided by the "burning sky" effects are impressive enough to excuse the movie's faulty science. It was filmed in Cinemascope, which always helps a "special effects show" like this.

The cast is a treat, too; in addition to Walter Pigeon there's Joan Fontaine, Frankie Avalon (who sings the title theme), Peter Lorre, and gorgeous Barbara Eden in a tight skirt.

Produced, written, and directed by Irwin Allen (along with co-writer Charles Bennett). The film's success inspired an energetic series of the same name.

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Robert (Butch) Day
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unca Irwin took advantage of the IGY discovery of what the press called "a radiation belt around the Earth" without waiting for the correct facts. That "belt" is actually part of the magnetic field surrounding the entire planet. It's also why there are no space stations at the 1,075 mile height 'predicted' by the early space books, TV programs and movies. That's the portion where the cosmic radiation is generally at its highest.
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scotpens
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 7:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961) Reply with quote

Bud Brewster wrote:

Walter Pidgeon ("Forbidden Planet") plays Admiral Nelson, designer and commander of the submarine called Seaview, the "Cadillac" of atomic subs, complete with big fins and gloriously oversized view ports.

I've always loved the Seaview's design. Sure, it's silly and impractical with those huge viewports and superfluous fins, but it's just so gorgeous. It's what a submarine should look like.


Bud Brewster wrote:
The cast is a treat, too; in addition to Walter Pidgeon there's Joan Fontaine, Frankie Avalon (who sings the title theme), Peter Lorre, and gorgeous Barbara Eden in a tight skirt.

Thank goodness they didn't use that sappy title tune for the TV series. In the 1950s and '60s, why did it seem that every movie theme song, even those written for science-fiction movies, had to be a love ballad?
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Robert (Butch) Day
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2015 8:54 am    Post subject: Re: Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961) Reply with quote

Scotpens wrote:
In the 1950s and '60s, why did it seem that every movie theme song, even those written for science-fiction movies, had to be a love ballad?


Simple. The admen were trying to hook the teen crowd at the drive-ins. Didn't work of course.
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Pow
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2015 9:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Irwin Allen did for intelligent sf what the iceberg did for the Titanic.
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Bud Brewster
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2015 10:52 am    Post subject: Re: Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961) Reply with quote

Robert (Butch) Day wrote:
Scotpens wrote:
In the 1950s and '60s, why did it seem that every movie theme song, even those written for science-fiction movies, had to be a love ballad?


Simple. The admen were trying to hook the teen crowd at the drive-ins. Didn't work of course.


Didn't work? Au contraire, mon ami!

Frankie Avalon was destined to become the crown prince of the drive-in matinee idols, along with Princess Annette and her court of sunburned beach bums. Irwin Allen's decision to have Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea begin with that lovely song was plum prophetic. Very Happy

Hell bells, I actually bought the 45 rpm record of the theme! And my little sister had a monstrous crush on Frankie back in the 1960s.

As for Scotpens' statement about the love theme's that so many movies had back in those days, I can only think of two other sci-fi movies that had ballads as part of their soundtracks: the absolutely terrible song that Riders to the Stars inflicted on us, and Journey to the Seventh Planet's hysterical closing theme.

So, I defend Irwin's decision to start off Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea with Frankie's musical invitation to come with me . . . come with me . . ., because it fits this amiable, family-friendly adventure like a tailor-made wetsuit! Wink

Here's Frankie to close the deal and win the argument for me, from the hit single that made him famous, complete with the extended orchestral opening, the soothing waves sounds, and a chorus of harmonizing seagulls -- none of which we get to hear in the actually opening credits!

Take it away, Frankie. ------ Cool



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scotpens
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2015 12:32 pm    Post subject: Re: Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1961) Reply with quote

Bud Brewster wrote:

As for Scotpens' statement about the love theme's that so many movies had back in those days, I can only think of two other sci-fi movies that had ballads as part of their soundtracks: the absolutely terrible song that Riders to the Stars inflicted on us, and Journey to the Seventh Planet's hysterical closing theme.


The closing credits of Master of the World (1961) list a title song with music by Les Baxter and lyrics by Lenny Addelson, sung by Darryl Stevens. Fortunately, the vocal version didn't make it into the final cut.

Here are the lyrics:

Quote:
Any man is Master of the World
If he has wandered in the world
And found his love
And of all the secrets of the earth
He has the only treasure worth
Dreaming of
If he rules just one heart, a man is a king
It seems as though his soul has taken wing
And like the stars that fly on high above the earth
A man is Master of the World
When he is loved!


Now, what in thundering hell do those lyrics have to do with the movie?
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Krel
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2015 1:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pow wrote:
Irwin Allen did for intelligent sf what the iceberg did for the Titanic.


But Irwin Allen didn't think of his shows, or movies as SF. He thought of them as action shows. He said that in an interview, back in the 70s in The Monster Times paper.

When he had the time and the buget .IA. could do some good sf and people episodes. If you watch some of the 1st/2nd season episodes of VTTBOTS, there were some good SF episodes.

David.
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Pow
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2015 5:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I understand that Irwin was a showman & not a Rod Serling,Stevens & Stafano,or Roddenberry,Krel.

I've read plenty of interviews with the writers of his TV shows.According to them he wanted "running,jumping shows."He used the word quibbling if a writer wanted to have consistent logic,character development,or any profound ideas in their scripts.

However,why did good writing & producing colorful sf series have to be at odds for Allen?
Trek had its share of running & jumping & action;usually supported by a strong & intriguing script.

I agree with you that there were some fine stories on the first season of VTTBOTS.Then it devolved into a monster of the week premise.
LIS was only good in the first few episodes of the first season before it became silly.
The Time Tunnel ignored actual historical facts.

Why was it so impossible to combine both intelligent storytelling with coherent plots & action?
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trekriffic
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2015 8:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of my favorite shows as a kid and one of my earliest model builds. Aurora produced a kit of the 8 window movie Seaview in 1966 which Polar Lights re-released in 2002. In 2010, Moebius Models released a kit of the 4 window TV version-in two scales! I have both the small 1/350 Seaview (built)and the huge 39 inch 1/128 scale Seaview (unbuilt) in my collection. Here's a pic of my smaller TV Seaview lit up launching a small aftermarket resin Flying Sub:

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Robert (Butch) Day
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2015 4:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pow wrote:
Why was it so impossible to combine both intelligent storytelling with coherent plots & action?


Because Unca Irwin had only ONE book in his office, his 'bible': What Makes Sammy Run? a 1941 a novel by Budd Schulberg inspired by the life of his father, early Hollywood mogul B. P. Schulberg. It is a rags to riches story chronicling the rise and fall of Sammy Glick, a Jewish boy born in New York's Lower East Side who, very early in his life, makes up his mind to escape the ghetto and climb the ladder of success by deception and betrayal. It was later made into a long-running Broadway musical.
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Pow
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2015 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Flying Sub is one of the coolest vehicles ever created for a sf TV show.
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Bud Brewster
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2015 4:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good grief, I can't believe this thread only has one picture of the Seaview!

I think I'll fix that.











There, that's better.
Very Happy
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trekriffic
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2015 5:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Go here to see photos of my model of the Seaview:

http://www.allsci-fi.us/phpbb/viewtopic.php?p=7185#7185
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Bud Brewster
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2015 5:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep, just came from there and I brought this with me because I knew how good it would look on this thread.

Yes, sir. Now don't that look purty? Very Happy




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